28 November 2011

KingCast and U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff say Sam Shaulson's Citibank is at it again, potentially robbing and cheating and lying and stealing.


Look at this case that His Honor sent to trial so that the American and World Public would know the Truth, instead of the $285M hush money that the SEC was settling for. It is their Modus Operandi, IMO..... wrote the Court:
"Finally, in any case like this that touches on the transparency of financial markets whose gyrations have so depressed our economy and debilitated our lives, there is an overriding public interest in knowing the truth. In much of the world, propaganda reigns, and truth is confined to secretive, fearful whispersEven in our nation, apologists for suppressing or obscuring the truth may always be found. But the S.E.C., of all agencies, has a duty, inherent in its statutory mission, to see that the truth emerges; and if fails to do so, this Court must not, in the name of deference or convenience, grant judicial enforcement to the agency’s contrivances. [my emphasis]"
And remember this journal entry? Excerpt: The hits keep coming for Attorney Sam Shaulson (pictured, left) and the scum bucket Citibank rats who opened a can of worms they can't shut now at MCAD. See, the Citibank scum buckets accused me of being a scammer, but they wrote the book on it.


Almost every multinational banking scam involves Citibank. I've been listing Enron, Ohio, California, Mexico, Russia and some of the others here and at Citibankisracist blog, but now here is yet another case closer to home and ongoing even. I have notified the authors of this 2009 Wall Street Journal story, "Citi, SEC Are in Talks to Settle Asset Probe." I'll tell you whose assets are getting probed: Those of the American Public if you catch my drift.
"Citigroup Inc. is in the early stages of negotiating with the Securities and Exchange Commission to settle an investigation into whether it misled investors by not properly disclosing the amount of troubled mortgage assets it held as the market began to implode in 2007, people familiar with the matter say.

Among issues being debated inside the SEC is whether, as a recipient of government-rescue funds, Citigroup should pay a large penalty in the case. There is concern at the SEC about the notion of financial firms in effect using taxpayer money to pay penalties, people close to the situation say. Citigroup received $45 billion from the government's Troubled Asset Relief Program and plans to raise an additional $5.5 billion in capital from private investors."
Shaulson_SEC_Mortgage_Enron_hijab_Memorandum.doc.

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