27 December 2007

KingCast notes a sad day in Asia as Benazir Bhutto is assassinated.

I breathed a sigh of relief when I first checked half an hour ago and read that she had escaped the suicide bomber's blast. Then I read in the Washington Post that there was a gunman who killed her. What a mixed-up World in which we live.


A nice post today from blogger Lawyerworldland that hit a good political point; and from one of my older posts click on NOFX to hear a great song bout Dubya'.... "he's the idiot son of an....."

8 comments:

The Lifeguard said...

Prolly an honour killing.

What insanity that there is so much killing in the name of religion.

http://jurypoollifeguard.blogspot.com

Anonymous said...

She was shot in the neck, and the chest, Floyd style.

Christopher King said...

Indeed, so many deaths over religion, it's unsane.

Speaking of Shooter Floyd, the "43 kills" (not) "3 tour Vietnam vet" (not) will prolly not be seen at the 10 Jan FOIA/Right-to-Know hearing in the Franconia shooting tragedy.

If I see him, I'm ducking.

Anonymous said...

why won't shooter floyd be in attendance? is his house still for sale? what number hummingbird lane? who is the listing realtor? just interested.
neighbors must be happy.

Anonymous said...

Also, Chris....what does "Live Free or Die" mean to you?
Anyone in Franconia or Easton care to comment on what it means to them? I'd like to know. I don't live there.

Anonymous said...

A possible source of such mottoes is Patrick Henry's famed March 23, 1775 speech to the House of Burgesses (the legislative body of the Virginia colony), which contained the following phrase: Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!

A medal struck at Matthew Boulton's Soho Mint, as tokens of exchange for the Paris firm of Monneron Freres, 1791-92, has on its obverse the motto Vivre libres ou mourir (Live free or die in French).

"Live Free or Die" is the official motto of New Hampshire, adopted by the General Court in 1945. It is possibly the best-known of all state mottos, partly because it speaks to an aggressive independence inherent in American political philosophy and partly because of its contrast to the mild sentiments usually found in such mottos.

The phrase comes from a toast written by General John Stark on July 31, 1809. Poor health forced Stark, New Hampshire's most famous soldier of the American Revolutionary War, to decline an invitation to an anniversary reunion of the Battle of Bennington and to send his toast by letter:

Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils.
The motto was enacted at the same time as the state emblem, on which it appears.

"meet the new boss, same as the old boss" discuss...

Anonymous said...

"i""Live Free or Die" is the official motto of New Hampshire, adopted by the General Court in 1945. It is possibly the best-known of all state mottos, partly because it speaks to an aggressive independence inherent in American political philosophy and partly because of its contrast to the mild sentiments usually found in such mottos."/i"

Comment: The documented, posthumous fight for Liko's freedoms is worthwhile. At best, vigilance will prevent another occurrence of unnecessary deaths.

Christopher King said...

Wow.

The "Eternal Vigilance" post is right here.

There's a little revolution afoot and before I read these comments my post for the evening were going to be about the snowman goggles and a little revolution. Something about today's assassination grounded the latter of the two.

I need to look for a cigarette after what I just read. Very inspirational and to the core. It's Legal Sexy, baby.

The Franconia Collective will be in mad effect on 10 Jan 2008. I called the Court today and the hearing is still on.

Namaste.